SIA Group places US$13.8 billion order for Boeing aircraft - TTG Asia - Leader in Hotel, Airlines, Tourism and Travel Trade News
 
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SIA Group places US$13.8 billion order for Boeing aircraft
Singapore, February 13, 2017
 

Singapore Airlines (SIA) has signed a letter of intent with Boeing comprising 39 firm orders plus six options for each aircraft type, which if exercised will enlarge the deal to 51 aircraft.

 

The proposed order is valued at US$13.8 billion.

 

 

Twenty 777-9s are due for delivery from the 2021/22 financial year, and nine 787-10s from the 2020/21 financial year. The order includes flexibility for the SIA Group to substitute the 787-10 orders for other variants of the 787 family.

 

The General Electric GE9X is the sole engine type for the 777-9s, which are intended primarily for use on longhaul routes. SIA has selected the Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 to power the 787-10s, which are to be operated on medium-range routes.

 

Currently, SIA has more than 50 current-generation 777 aircraft in service. Subsidiaries SilkAir, Scoot and SIA Cargo are also operators of Boeing aircraft, with 737-800s, 787-8/9s and 747-400 Freighters in service, respectively.

 

This is the SIA Group’s first order for the newest 777 variant that is currently under development, the 777-9. SIA is already the launch customer for the 787-10, which is also currently in development, having placed an initial order in 2013 for 30 aircraft for delivery from the 2018/19 financial year.

 

In addition to its 30 previously-ordered 787-10s, SIA has outstanding orders with Airbus for five A380-800s and 57 A350-900s. SilkAir has outstanding orders with Boeing for 37 737 MAX 8s, while Scoot has orders with Boeing for eight 787-8/9s and Tigerair has orders with Airbus for 39 A320neos.

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